By Ali Soulati, DDS
April 15, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   flossing  
NotCrazyaboutFlossingTryaWaterFlosser

The most important part of dental health maintenance isn’t what your dentist does—it’s what you do every day when you brush and floss your teeth. And all you really need is a multi-tufted, soft bristle toothbrush, toothpaste, a roll of dental floss—plus a little effort from your hands and fingers.

Of course, manual power isn’t your only option—an electric or battery-powered toothbrush is a convenient and, for people with strength or dexterity issues, a necessary way to remove disease-causing plaque from tooth surfaces. You have a similar option with flossing—a water flosser.

Although water flossers (or oral irrigators) have been around since the early 1960s, they’ve become more efficient and less expensive in recent years. A water flosser delivers a pulsating stream of pressurized water between the teeth through a handheld device that resembles a power toothbrush, but with a special tip. The water action loosens plaque and then flushes it away.

While the convenience these devices provide over traditional flossing is a major selling point, they’re also quite beneficial for people with special challenges keeping plaque from accumulating between teeth. People wearing braces or other orthodontic devices, for example, may find it much more difficult to effectively maneuver thread floss around their hardware. Water flossing can be an effective alternative.

But is water flossing a good method for removing between-teeth plaque? If performed properly, yes. A 2008 study, for example, reviewed orthodontic patients who used water flossing compared to those only brushing. The study found that those using water flossing were able to remove five times as much plaque as the non-flossing group.

If you’re considering water flossing over traditional flossing thread, talk with your dental hygienist. He or she can give you advice on purchasing a water flosser, as well as how to use the device for optimum performance. It could be a great and more convenient way to keep plaque from between your teeth and harming your dental health.

If you would like more information on water flossing, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cleaning between Your Teeth: How Water Flossing can help.”

By Ali Soulati, DDS
March 31, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: mouth rash  
CertainMouthRashesDontRespondtoTopicalSteroidTreatments

You've been treating a persistent rash around your mouth with medicated ointments, but it's not going away. The problem may be the ointment — it could actually be sustaining the particular rash you have.

Peri-oral dermatitis is a scaly rash with small bumps (some filled with pus) around the mouth, eyes or nose. It's especially common among women ages 20-45, possibly due to hormonal factors or cosmetic use. Other than its unattractiveness you might not otherwise notice it, although it can cause stinging, itching or burning. There are ways to treat it effectively, though not necessarily the way you might think.

Many skin conditions respond well to topical steroids, like ointments or lotions containing hydrocortisone. But prolonged use of a steroid for skin irritations might actually increase risks for peri-oral dermatitis. Applying it to an existing rash may also deceive you — the steroid constricts some of the skin's tinier blood vessels, which will make the rash appear as if it's fading. The effect, though, usually doesn't last more than an hour. If you continue to use the steroid, the rash won't get better.

The key to alleviating peri-oral dermatitis requires treatment from a physician, dermatologist or dentist, who will also be able to accurately diagnose the specific skin condition you have. If it is peri-oral dermatitis, the first step is to stop using any topical steroids and only wash with mild soap or similar substitute. You'll have to be patient because the rash may at first appear to flare up and worsen before getting better.

Instead of steroids, we may prescribe antibiotics to help clear the rash, typically tetracycline. It may take several weeks of use before the rash begins to clear; as it does clear, you would either stop the antibiotic treatment or taper off over a four-to-five week period.

While some cases of peri-oral dermatitis will clear up and remain that way, some people may experience chronic reoccurrences. Even so, by using the same treatment approach we can still effectively manage the condition for the long-term.

If you would like more information on peri-oral dermatitis and similar rashes, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Ali Soulati, DDS
March 16, 2018
Category: Oral Health
SofiaVergaraObsessedWithOralHygiene

A woman as gorgeous and funny as Sofia Vergara surely planned to be a model and actress from the get-go, right? Wrong! Sofia’s first career choice actually was to be… a dentist! That’s right, the sexy star of TV’s Modern Family actually was only two semesters shy of finishing a dental degree in her native Columbia when she traded dental school for the small screen. Still, dental health remains a top priority for the actress and her son, Manolo.

“I’m obsessed,” she recently told People magazine. “My son thinks I’m crazy because I make him do a cleaning every three months. I try to bribe the dentist to make him to do it sooner!”

That’s what we call a healthy obsession (teeth-cleaning, not bribery). And while coming in for a professional cleaning every three months may not be necessary for everyone, some people — especially those who are particularly susceptible to gum disease — may benefit from professional cleanings on a three-month schedule. In fact, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to having professional teeth cleanings — but everyone needs this beneficial procedure on a regular basis.

Even if you are meticulous about your daily oral hygiene routine at home, there are plenty of reasons for regular checkups. They include:

  • Dental exam. Oral health problems such as tooth decay and gum disease are much easier — and less expensive — to treat in the earliest stages. You may not have symptoms of either disease early on, but we can spot the warning signs and take appropriate preventive or restorative measures.
  • Oral cancer screening. Oral cancer is not just a concern of the middle aged and elderly — young adults can be affected as well (even those who do not smoke). The survival rate for this deadly disease goes up tremendously if it is detected quickly, and an oral cancer screening is part of every routine dental visit.
  • Professional teeth cleaning. Calcified (hardened) dental plaque (tartar or calculus) can build up near the gum line over time — even if you brush and floss every day. These deposits can irritate your gums and create favorable conditions for tooth decay. You can’t remove tartar by flossing or brushing, but we can clear it away — and leave you with a bright, fresh-feeling smile!

So take a tip from Sofia Vergara, and don’t skimp on professional cleanings and checkups. If you want to know how often you should come in for routine dental checkups, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor articles “Dental Hygiene Visit” and “Dental Cleanings Using Ultrasonic Scalers.”

KnowtheRisksandBenefitsforSame-DayToothReplacement

While there’s usually a period of months between implant placement and the permanent crown, a new technique known as same-day tooth replacement installs both the implant and a temporary crown during the same visit. But be advised — it does have its risks and isn’t for everyone.

Successful same-day replacements require special attention during the three phases for implants: the removal (extraction) of the existing tooth; placement of the implant in the bone; and attachment of the crown, the visible tooth, to the implant. The tooth extraction lays the foundation for the entire process; the extraction procedure must be performed carefully to avoid undue damage to the socket. In addition, if infection or disease has compromised the site, an implant may not be possible immediately.

The implant must then be placed in the bone so that it’s stable and immovable. All implants stabilize with time as the bone grows and adheres to them, but we need greater stability for a same-day tooth replacement when an extraction is performed.

Our last consideration is positioning the implant so that the attached crown blends in naturally with the surrounding gum tissue and adjacent teeth. We must place it at the proper depth below the gum tissues so that the crown appears to emerge from them in the proper tooth length.

Taking extra care during all these phases, including the angle of crown attachment, will increase our chances of success. We still run a risk of implant damage or failure, however, from biting forces before the implant fully integrates with the bone. This means avoiding chewy foods and other situations that might increase the force on the implant. We may also use a temporary crown that’s slightly shorter than adjacent teeth so it won’t make full contact with the opposing tooth.

If you’d like to know if you’re a good candidate for a same-day tooth replacement, see us for a detailed examination. After reviewing your needs, we’ll be able to discuss with you the risks and benefits for a new look in one day.

If you would like more information on same-day tooth replacement, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Same-Day Tooth Replacement with Dental Implants.”

By Ali Soulati, DDS
February 14, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   nutrition  
AHealthyDietisYourBestSourceforVitaminsandMinerals

The food we eat not only provides us energy, but it also supplies nutrients to help the body remain healthy. The most important of these nutrients are minerals and tiny organic compounds called vitamins.

While all of the thirteen known vitamins and eleven minerals play a role in overall health, a few are especially important for your mouth. For example, vitamins D and K and the minerals calcium and phosphorus are essential for strong teeth. Another mineral, fluoride, helps fortify enamel, which can deter tooth decay.

Other vitamins and minerals serve as antioxidants, protecting us against molecules called free radicals that can damage cellular DNA and increasing our risk of cancer (including oral). Vitamins C and E and the mineral selenium fall into this category, as well as zinc for DNA repair.

We acquire these nutrients primarily in the foods we eat. But for certain people like older adults or pregnant or nursing women a healthy diet may not be enough. Any person who can't get enough of a particular vitamin or mineral should take a supplement to round out their nutritional needs.

If you don't have a condition that results in a nutrient deficiency, you may not see that much benefit from taking a supplement. In fact, taking too much of a dietary supplement could harm your health. For example, some studies have shown ingesting too much supplemental Vitamin E could increase the risk of heart failure or gastrointestinal cancer. And some dietary supplements can interact poorly with drugs like blood thinners or ibuprofen.

The best way to get the vitamins and minerals your body — and mouth — needs is to eat a healthy diet. Dairy products like fortified milk are a good way to get vitamin D, as well as calcium and phosphorus. Fruits and vegetables are a good source of Vitamin C. And while you can take in fluoride from toothpaste or other oral hygiene products, you'll also find it in seafood and tea.

While good oral hygiene and regular dental visits are necessary for dental health, your diet can also make a difference. Be sure you're getting all the nutrients your teeth and gums need.

If you would like more information on the role of diet in oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Vitamins & Dietary Supplements.”





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